Posts Tagged ‘heinekenmexicano

08
Nov
14

day 1 of about 200 in liberia

November 8, 2014

I arrived last night and spent my first day getting to know the team, organizing my stuff and generally ambling around town, observing. And it occurred to me that the main drag of Monrovia looked familiar. Not just from my time in East Africa, but it also looked remarkably similar to roads in parts of India, where I was last month. In fact, they all have a selfsame feel in the way that shops displayed their wares, a single asphalt track fell away on both sides to reveal dirt lots buffering shop fronts. The fixtures, the architecture, the shop names – they all had a vague resemblance, despite the countries’ vast differences. I recognized the feeling and what was causing it: we are, in some way, at the end of the world here. i don’t mean physically or even metaphysically, and certainly not judgmentally. This isn’t the end of a normalized civilization or an otherworldly universe. It’s something else: it’s a supply chain issue. The pattern I picked up was that Liberia and other developing countries sometimes don’t attract big brand names or household items. Their markets and shops draw from a hodgepodge of vendors from abroad, many of whom are small-scale or produce knock-off products that they slap Japanese-sounding names on.

Here are a few I noticed today:

1. When you don’t have big box marts around and you need blankets or curtains, you run the risk of creating color schemes that might show up at a classy brothel. The point of being on these sub-branches of the supply chain is you just don’t really have a choice.

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2. And sometimes you risk getting a blanket that says (in French): “a cloud floats in the sky” while underneath, a lamb floats in the sky with a bird.

IMG_32663. I wasn’t daring enough to try one, but I am intensely curious about a “Heineken Mexicano”. Please tell me you know what that is.

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So yes, we are here for a very specific focused task, and we will be throwing everything we have at ending this outbreak. But there’s lots going on here, too, that doesn’t have to do with Ebola. Liberia has a fascinating past and hopefully a strong future. For now, I’m here, and I’d like to show you as much as possible from that experience of simply being here.

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